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LIVE HoodHype.com webcast tonight @ 7:30
August 5, 2010


The HoodHype Show will be LIVE via WEBCAST Tonight (Thursday, August 5th) at 7:30 PM Eastern!!


We’re back and the stash box is stashed! We got some hot new music, great new drink and so many fun topics to talk about tonight in hip-hop I can’t even list them all. Here are just a few of tonight’s show topics after the jump

  • Laurence Fishburn’s daughter going into porn
  • Shaq moves to the Celtics
  • Hip-Hopocracy: Talib Kweli & Gucci Mane record a track together (whack as hell)
  • Slum Village breaks up over some fuckery
  • Wyclef runs for President of Haiti
  • Young Buck’s House Gets Raided
  • and thats just scratching the surface…

We want to hear your take on all these topics, so make sure you pop in the chat at hoodhype.com or give us a call TOLL FREE tonight!! If you can’t make it, no worries, drop us an email any time as well at info@hoodhype.com or hit us on twitter.com/hoodhype with your comments!

Remember you can call in ANY TIME LIVE or NOT at 888-THA-HYPE (888-842-4973)or if you’re overseas, call us up at +1 (313) 334-3377



How do I listen to the show?

All Internet Users: Tune in simply by going to the front page of HoodHype.com and you can chat and watch/listen LIVE!

On the Go? Cell Phone users with data plans: visit: http://hoodhype.com/mobile and tune in from your phone! LIVE AT 7:30pm EST!

Winamp Users: Get that high-quality audio and tune in at SmoothBeats.com LIVE! at 7:30 pm EST tonight!

iTunes users?:Search “SmoothBeats” in iTunes radio within iTunes and tune in live!

Can’t make the show? No Problem! You can ALWAYS listen to the recorded podcast FREE anytime at HoodHype.com or search us up on Last.FM or iTunes Store!!


Most importantly we get to get in and chill with all of you and talk some shit! Lines will be open, we’ll be spinning some GREAT music and have a DAMN good time in the basement tonight!

Lots going on! Tonight 8/5/10 at 7:30 PM Eastern! See you there!





  • trex

    Great show. Parenting topic was really interesting and I gotta get in on that discussion. I see what JMack is saying but Major’s on point. A few things kind of cross my mind that you guys didn’t dive into:

    1. You didn’t touch on it too much but there must be some meaningful tracks that you can share and discuss with your spouse. Of course, it’s gonna be harder to convince your spouse to let your kids listen to it if all they have is an ignorant opinion on hip hop.

    2. Don’t know how you got into hip hop but some ‘cool’ kids in grade school introduced me to Doggystyle. Prior to that, all I listened to was Ace of Base, Boyz II Men, Mariah Carey, and other 90s pop. Something about Snoop pulled me right in. Then shortly after it was Tupac, Biggie – all the shit that I secretly listen to in my walkman.

    Where I’m going is that if they don’t get any exposure at all, the first exposure they get may set them off on the wrong track. Don’t get me wrong, Doggystyle is an important hip-hop record for a lot of reasons, but I’d be worried if it was my sister who was introduced to hip hop that way.

    3. If you shelter your kids from your passion, what are you gonna do down the road when they discover your passion? Kids can be pretty mean…so if a group of them discovers that HoodHype and everyone knows except your kid she’d be humiliated if the first time they find out is through another kid. The internet is forever and nicknames ain’t gonna hide your voice.

    4. Radio has always had raunchy music. Don’t know if you remember all the controversy around Pony by Ginuwine? Major hit it right on the head when he discussed the subtlety in pop music. Pony was a huge hit and was very catchy. But when I was coming up I didn’t know the actual meaning. I’d argue that Lollipop is virtually identical. Heck if you wanna go back further same controversy when people thought The Rolling Stones were ranchy compared to the Beatles. Specifically, “I Wanna Hold Your Hand” versus “Lets Spend the Night Together”. And don’t forget “Soon I’ll be Loving You” by Marvin Gaye is about giving head lmao.

    The bottom line is that music at its forefront is about music. Most genres of music traditionally focus on melody and instrumentation whereas Hip-Hop has traditionally focused on lyrics. Partly because of this, there’s a bigger scrutiny about what’s being said. Compound that with explicit lyrics and it’s a perfect storm for why kids shouldn’t listen to Hip-Hop. Pop music has it easy because catchy melodies disguise controversial lyrics.

    Recently it feels like more hip-hop artists have started caring more about melody, in comparison to the past where looped samples & the DJ were heavily emphasized. And this is a double-edged sword. Good melodic content can enhance hip-hop. A lot of Kanye’s music, especially Late Registration, can be listened to purely on the basis of its melodic content. And I think that’s partly why Kanye has been so successful. But it’s still gotta be hip-hop at its roots. The whole auto-tune thing was melody without a hip-hop basis for those who didn’t do it well.

    Anyways, my opinion is that if you can introduce good music it’s better alternative than discovering bad music. When they start listening to horrible hip-hop, it’s gonna be harder for them to discover good hip hop. But if they’re introduced to good hip-hop they’ll probably still get introduced to horrible hip hop but the impact will probably be lessened because it’s not like they haven’t heard hip hop at all.

  • trex

    And fuck JMack for dismissing live instrumentation & orchestras in hip hop. I’m partially biased because I play the sax, but honestly that shit elevates hip hop to a whole new level.

    If you want to get down to it, Classical music has more complexity and depth than any other genre of music. If you hear “O Fortuna” you know some shit’s about to go down. Or listen to all 4 movements of New World Symphony by Antonin Dvorak.

    Music today simply has a single melody, no change in dynamics, no counter-melody, no change in instrumentation, no change in tempo, no interesting time signatures, no interesting key changes (I hate those cheesy bridge then key change in pop music).

    Part of the reason The Beatles are such a highly regarded group is because they actually cared about music. Listen to Yesterday by The Beatles. The counter-melody and accompaniment provided by string quartet is just as important as the vocalist. In a song that’s just over 2 minutes long, there is more musical depth than there is in most must out today.

    Whenever someone’s bringing more musicianship to hip hop that’s a good thing in my opinion. When I first listened to “Be” by Common I had to listen to it multiple times. It’s only 2 and half minutes long but there’s a lot of interesting things happening in music beneath common’s lyrics.

    However, I completely agree with you that purely adding live instrumentation doesn’t amount to shit. Yeah it’s cool that Just Blaze used an orchestra but looping a small portion simply makes it a gimmick. Bottom line is that the track still sucks. But listen to how Kanye mixed the violin in Two Words. It adds a lot of flavour and depth to the track and it’s not simply a loop of live instruments. And him letting Jon Brion executive produce Late Registration was a brilliant move.

    And of course, then there are artists who have had musical training can be on a whole other level. You mentioned The Roots, but there’s also Alicia Keys and John Legend. If you’re a Jazz geek you’ll probably understand the significance of the title “Harlem’s Nocturne” on Alicia Keys first album as it’s a play on the jazz classic, “Harlem Nocturne”.

    Anyways maybe you’re just running into bad tracks with live instrumentation. I’m assuming you’ve already heard the latest from the roots (which features a Harp!). I urge to watch this orchestrated version of Kanye’s Diamonds from Sierra Leone: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qfe4kiNioJ0

    Just like auto-tune, live instrumentation can be a gimmick but it adds so much depth when used well. Same with other genres too – “No Leaf Clover” by Metallica and the San Franscisco Symphony is one of my favourite songs.

  • trex

    And fuck JMack for dismissing live instrumentation & orchestras in hip hop. I’m partially biased because I play the sax, but honestly that shit elevates hip hop to a whole new level.

    If you want to get down to it, Classical music has more complexity and depth than any other genre of music. If you hear “O Fortuna” you know some shit’s about to go down. Or listen to all 4 movements of New World Symphony by Antonin Dvorak.

    Music today simply has a single melody, no change in dynamics, no counter-melody, no change in instrumentation, no change in tempo, no interesting time signatures, no interesting key changes (I hate those cheesy bridge then key change in pop music).

    Part of the reason The Beatles are such a highly regarded group is because they actually cared about music. Listen to Yesterday by The Beatles. The counter-melody and accompaniment provided by string quartet is just as important as the vocalist. In a song that’s just over 2 minutes long, there is more musical depth than there is in most must out today.

    Whenever someone’s bringing more musicianship to hip hop that’s a good thing in my opinion. When I first listened to “Be” by Common I had to listen to it multiple times. It’s only 2 and half minutes long but there’s a lot of interesting things happening in music beneath common’s lyrics.

    However, I completely agree with you that purely adding live instrumentation doesn’t amount to shit. Yeah it’s cool that Just Blaze used an orchestra but looping a small portion simply makes it a gimmick. Bottom line is that the track still sucks. But listen to how Kanye mixed the violin in Two Words. It adds a lot of flavour and depth to the track and it’s not simply a loop of live instruments. And him letting Jon Brion executive produce Late Registration was a brilliant move.

    And of course, then there are artists who have had musical training can be on a whole other level. You mentioned The Roots, but there’s also Alicia Keys and John Legend. If you’re a Jazz geek you’ll probably understand the significance of the title “Harlem’s Nocturne” on Alicia Keys first album as it’s a play on the jazz classic, “Harlem Nocturne”.

    Anyways maybe you’re just running into bad tracks with live instrumentation. I’m assuming you’ve already heard the latest from the roots (which features a Harp!). I urge to watch this orchestrated version of Kanye’s Diamonds from Sierra Leone: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qfe4kiNioJ0

    Just like auto-tune, live instrumentation can be a gimmick but it adds so much depth when used well. Same with other genres too – “No Leaf Clover” by Metallica and the San Franscisco Symphony is one of my favourite songs.

  • http://twitter.com/jmackhh JMack

    I agree with you Trex. I think there is also an underlying social issue when it comes to hip-hop. Theres a lot of negativity that comes with hip-hops past as well, sometimes I get stuck in it.

    Dont get me wrong, the kids know its my passion. I spent a couple of years bangin out hip-hop music in my Triton and guitar in my basement for quite sometime. They DO get some exposure to it, just not a lot. I take a lot of responsibility though, for not actively looking for the types of music I like that had more of a positive image. I let society dictate how I raise my kids in some situations and thats just a personal flaw that the dude from the UK called out pretty quick and has now been brought out lol.

    I loved this episode or this whole discussing that it has brought up.

    http://hoodhype.com/blog/?p=6722

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